Tuesday, 30 September 2014

Services in October 2014

at Audley and Dresden



Wed 1st 11am Divine Liturgy

Sat 4th No Local ServicesPilgimage Saint Winifred in Holywell

Sun 5th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 8th 11am Divine Liturgy

Sat 11th 6pm Great Vespers
Sun 12th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 15th 11am Divine Liturgy

Sat 18th 6pm Great Vespers
Sun 19th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 22nd 11am Divine Liturgy

Sat 25th 6pm Great Vespers
Sun 26th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy

Wed 29th 11am Divine Liturgy


Name Days
9th James
12th Edwin; Wilfred
18th Luke (Howard) Joy
23rd Jacovos
28th Terence

Reposed
10th Richard (2013)
19th Metropolitan Gabriel (2007)

Advance Notice:

Parish Feast of the Synaxis of the Holy Archangels – Saturday 8
th November

This is the first time we have the opportunity to invite other priests and their people to
share in our Patronal Feast. We now have a church spacious enough to accommodate as
many as will come and Saturday is easier for people to be out of their own parishes.
We shall serve Great Vespers and Memorial on the Friday at 7pm at Audley, then on the
Saturday 10am Matins, 11am Divine Liturgy and Artoklasia at Dresden, with festal
refreshments afterwards. Let’s make this a very special occasion to show our hospitality
and share our joy.

Holy Archangel Michael pray to God for us!

Autumn Fayre - Saturday 25th October 2014


So much to do, so little time...
Apologies for the lack of proper newsletter this month.


Autumn Fayre
Please pledge your services and resources to Kim and Irene who are working hard as always
to get this month’s Autumn Fayre up and running.

This will be in the Scout Hall on Saturday 25th October from 11am until 2pm.

Please bring goods to church to be sorted and priced, well in advance of this date – it’s not
too late to rootle through your cupboards and attics.
If you cannot find anything to bring – or even if you can – then bring yourself!
We still need staff to look after the stalls, make refreshments and do some meeting and
greeting.
If you can do none of these things, any donations would be most acceptable but we would
rather have you than your money if possible.

Saturday, 30 August 2014

Services in September 2014 at Audley and Dresden

Wed 3rd           11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist

Sat 6th              6pm Great Vespers
Sun 7th            10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Mon 8th            11am Divine Liturgy of the Feast of the Nativity 
                              of the All-holy Theotokos
Wed 10th          11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist

Sat 13th            6pm Great Vespers
Sun 14th          10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 17th          11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist

Sat 20th             6pm Great Vespers
Sun 21st           10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 24th           11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist

Sat 27th             6pm Great Vespers
Sun 28th           10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy

Name Days
5th       Emma Louise Elizabeth Bostan
8th       Francesca Joy
9th       Anna Oshkereli
17th     Sofia
24th     Thecla Read
26th     John Roger, John Chadwick

Reposed
3rd       Leon (2010)
10th     Gearge Harry Fearns (2005)
24th     Fr Dennis (2010)

Parish Feasts

14th     Holy Cross, Lancaster

Two churches, one parish
As you can well imagine, with the great blessing of two churches, there is twice as much work to be done to preserve our Faith and Worship, not to mention our two buildings, decently and in good order.
Very few actually contribute to the “working” of the Church Worship and maintenance, thus making it a heavy, though very enjoyable, burden on those few.
There are the “visible”: servers; singers; readers; candle-tenders; and in the hall, tea makers; servers and washers-up (and Priest! - Ed.)
Then there are the “invisible”: cleaners; candle-makers; bread-bakers; seamstresses; kolyva makers; bookstall workers and flower arrangers.
The parish council is needed to help organize the fund-raising and social life of the parish. We are very short of members for the council.
All that is needed for any of these “jobs” is the willing heart. Training can be given for any of the specialist “jobs”.
The very least that is expected of everyone is attendance at every Divine Liturgy, but much more is needed to bring us great blessings and a real feeling of belonging to the parish family. If you are willing to help in any way please speak to Fr. Samuel.

Donations to Syria
The thousands of pounds we managed to contribute to the Syria appeal through Fr Gregory have been dispatched to Syria, but not quite in the way we anticipated. Fr Gregory came up against all sorts of problems in transferring funds from the UK to Syria, there being various roadblocks in place with banks and the Foreign Office to prevent foreign funding of terrorist activities. He was not able to overcome these and so the whole amount was contributed to the workings of an authorised charity working in the area. UNICEF are carrying out similar work to the offices of our Patriarchate in providing food, medical supplies and shelter to those of all faiths in the area. Although essentially a children’s charity, the work undertaken to improve the lives of children inevitably has benefits for their families and the community. Please make further donations direct to that charity or others of your choice, rather than contributing through St Michael’s from now on – it will all end up in the same place anyway.


Work in the South Aisle
Varnishing of the floor in the South Aisle was completed just in time for the arrival of the new icon of the Theotokos “Life Giving Spring”.
Many murmurings over the past couple of weeks have complimented Terence on his fine work.
The icon currently stands in isolation, flanked by a couple of pews we found in the vestry, but it is anticipated that over time, more icons will be added and the iconostasis effectively extended right across the church.

Terence is of course very happy to take commissions although I fear his waiting list is going to be growing by the week! His next work for the church is, I am reliably informed, a memorial cross to hang where the memorial candles are currently located.

On the subject of candles…
In front of the two principle icons, two silver candlesticks in the middle of the sand hold small nightlights which will last for the whole service. This means that unless you particularly want to add a new candle, one will always be lit at the icon and you don’t need to wander to the back of church to replenish them when the last orange one burns out. J
Note to our younger parishioners – the candles represent people’s offerings and prayers. Please don’t play with them or treat the whole as a sandpit for your entertainment!

Autumn Fayre
The preparations for the Autumn Fayre are already starting to get underway. Kim tells me that it happens in October.
New artefacts to sell would be gratefully received as stocks are running very low after the success of previous Fayres and you cannot keep trotting out the stuff that didn’t sell last time after all!
Please sort through your cupboards, sheds, attics and especially under the stairs, and bring whatever you find to add a little to church funds.
This is also an excellent opportunity to volunteer to help, as per Fr Samuel’s plea at the start of this newsletter. The Fayre will not set itself up, and we all benefit in some way from the proceeds!

Nativity of the Theotokos
The Holy Virgin and Theotokos Mary was born to elderly and previously barren parents by the names of Joachim and Anna, in answer to their prayers. Orthodox Christians do not hold to the Roman Catholic doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, in which it is supposed that Mary was preserved from the ancestral sin that befalls us all as descendents of Adam and Eve, in anticipation of her giving birth to the sinless Christ. The Orthodox believe that Mary indeed received the ancestral sin, having been conceived in the normal way of humanity, and thus needed salvation like all mankind. Orthodox thought does vary on whether Mary actually ever sinned, though there is general agreement that she was cleansed from sin at the Annunciation.
On the eve of the feast, Vespers is served and contains three Old Testament readings that have New Testament meaning. In Genesis 28:10-17, Jacob's Ladder which unites heaven and earth points to the union of God with men which is realised most fully and perfectly in Mary the bearer of God. "How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven!" In Ezekiel 43:27-44:4, the vision of the temple with the door to the East perpetually closed and filled with the glory of the Lord, symbolizes Mary. And in Proverbs 9:1-11, Mary is also identified with the "house" which the Divine Wisdom has built for herself.
Sometimes Matins is served on the morning of the feast. The Gospel reading is from Luke 1:39-49, 56. It is read on all feasts of the Theotokos and includes the Theotokos' saying: "My soul magnifies the Lord and my spirit rejoices in God my Saviour, for he has regarded the low estate of his handmaiden, for behold, henceforth all generations will call me blessed."
Divine Liturgy is served on the day on the feast. The epistle reading is from Philippians 2:5-11, and speaks of "Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men." The gospel reading is taken from Luke 10:38-42 and 11:27-28 together; this reading is also always read on all feasts of the Theotokos. In it, the Lord says, "blessed are those who hear the word of God and keep it!"


Friday, 1 August 2014

Services in August 2014

at Audley and Dresden

Dormition Fast starts on 1st August!
Sat 2nd       Pilgrimage to Ilam (no local service)
Sun 3rd      10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Tue 5th       7pm Great Vespers of the 
                   Feast of the Transfiguration
Wed 6th     11am Divine Liturgy of the 
                   Feast of the Transfiguration

Sat 9th        6pm Great Vespers
Sun 10th     10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 13th    11am Paraklesis to the Theotokos
Thu 14th     7pm Great Vespers of the Dormition


Fri 15th       11am Divine Liturgy of the Dormition

Sat 16th      6pm Great Vespers
Sun 17th     10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 20th    11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist

Sat 23rd      6pm Great Vespers
Sun 24th     10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy
Wed 27th    11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist
Thu 18th     7pm Great Vespers of the 
                   Beheading of Saint John the Baptist
Fri 29th       11am Divine Liturgy of the 
                   Beheading of Saint John the Baptist

Sat 30th       6pm Great Vespers
Sun 31st     10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy

Name Days
16th     Sub-Deacon Radu
20th     Fr Samuel
Parish Feasts
9th       Saint Matthias, Lincoln
31st     Saint Aidan, Levenshulme


Feast of the Dormition of the Theotokos
According to Orthodox Tradition, Mary died like all humanity, "falling asleep," so to speak, as the name of the feast indicates. She died as all people die, not "voluntarily" as her Son, but by the necessity of her mortal human nature which is indivisibly bound up with the corruption of this world. The feast was added to the Roman calendar in the seventh century as the Dormitio. In the eighth century, the title was changed to the Assumptio (Assumption).
The Apostles were miraculously summoned to this event, and all were present except Thomas when Mary passed from this life. She was then buried.
Thomas arrived a few days later, and desiring to see her one more time, convinced the others to open her tomb. Upon doing so, the Apostles discovered that her body was no longer present. This event is seen as a firstfruits of the resurrection of the faithful that will occur at the Second Coming of Christ. The event is normally called the Dormition, though there are many Orthodox parishes in English-speaking countries with the name Assumption. In Greek, Dormition is Koimisis - falling asleep in death - from which the word cemetery derives.
As with the nativity of the Virgin and the feast of her entrance to the temple, there are no biblical or historical sources for this feast. The Orthodox Church teaches that Mary is without personal sins, as well that Mary truly needed to be saved by Christ as all human persons are saved from the trials, sufferings, and death of this world. She truly died and was raised up by her Son as the Mother of Life and participates already in the eternal life of paradise. This life of paradise is prepared and promised to all who "hear the word of God and keep it." (Luke 11:27-28)
The feast is preceded by 14 days of strict fasting, with the exception that fish is eaten on the Feast of the Transfiguration (August 6).
On the eve of the feast, Vespers is served and contains three Old Testament readings that have New Testament meaning. In Genesis 28:10-17, Jacob's Ladder which unites heaven and earth points to the union of God with men which is realised most fully and perfectly in Mary the bearer of God. "How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven!" In Ezekiel 43:27-44:4, the vision of the temple with the door to the East perpetually closed and filled with the glory of the Lord, symbolizes Mary. And in Proverbs 9:1-11, Mary is also identified with the "house" which the Divine Wisdom has built for herself.
Sometimes Matins is served on the morning of the feast. The Gospel reading is from Luke 1:39-49, 56. It is read on all feasts of the Theotokos and includes the Theotokos' saying: "My soul magnifies the Lord and my spirit rejoices in God my Saviour, for he has regarded the low estate of his handmaiden, for behold, henceforth all generations will call me blessed."
Divine Liturgy is served on the day on the feast. In some churches, it is the custom to bless flowers on this feast before the Liturgy. The epistle reading is from Philippians 2:5-11, and speaks of "Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men." The gospel reading is taken from Luke 10:38-42 and 11:27-28 together; this reading is also always read on all feasts of the Theotokos. In it, the Lord says, "blessed are those who hear the word of God and keep it!"

Feast of the Transfiguration of Christ
The Transfiguration of Christ is one of the Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church, celebrated on August 6.
Jesus had gone with his disciples Peter, James, and John to Mount Tabor. Christ's appearance was changed while they watched into a glorious radiant figure. There appeared Elijah and Moses, speaking with Jesus. The disciples were amazed and terribly afraid.
This event shows forth the divinity of Christ, so that the disciples would understand after his Ascension that He was truly the radiant splendour of the Father, and that his Passion was voluntary (Mark 9:2-9). It also shows the possibility of our own theosis.
This event was the subject of some debates between Gregory Palamas and Barlaam of Calabria. Barlaam believed that the light shining from Jesus was created light, while Gregory maintained the disciples were given grace to perceive the uncreated light of God. This supported Gregory's larger argument that although we cannot know God in His essence, we can know Him in his energies, as He reveals Himself.
Accounts of the Transfiguration are found in the Bible: Matthew 17:1-8, Mark 9:2-9, Luke 9:28-36, and II Peter 1:16-19.
Like all feasts of the Master, the Transfiguration is a vigil-ranked feast, though in parish practice a full All-Night Vigil is usually not celebrated.
Typically, Great Vespers is conducted on the eve of the feast, and on the morning of the feast, the Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom is celebrated, traditionally preceded by the Matins service.
The Vespers service includes the readings: Exodus 24:12-18, 33:11-23, 34:4-6, 8; I Kings 19:3-9, 11-13, 15-16. The Matins service includes the reading: Luke 9:28-36. And the Divine Liturgy: II Peter 1:10-19; Matthew 17:1-9.
It is believed that Christ's transfiguration took place at the time of the Jewish Festival of Booths, and that the celebration of the event in the Christian Church became the New Testament fulfilment of the Old Testament feast. Presently it is celebrated on the sixth of August, forty days before the feast of the Elevation of the Holy Cross. Just as Peter, James, and John saw the transfiguration before the crucifixion so that they might know who it is who will suffered for them, the Church connects these two feasts to help the faithful understand the mission of Christ and that his suffering was voluntary.
The feast of the Transfiguration of Christ once belonged to the season of Great Lent, but may have been considered too joyous for that time. Saint Gregory Palamas, a great teacher of the Transfiguration, is now celebrated on one of the Sundays of Lent instead.

In Greece and Romania the harvest season traditionally began on the Transfiguration. Grapes, in particular, were not eaten before August 6. In some parishes, the first grapes would be brought to church for a blessing and distributed to parishioners.

Friday, 4 July 2014

Services in July 2014

at Audley and Dresden

Wed 2nd 11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist 

Sat 5th 6pm Great Vespers 
Sun 6th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy 
Wed 9th 11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist 

Sat 12th Pilgrimage to Crowland 
6pm Reader Vespers 
Sun 13th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy 
Mon 14th 7pm Meeting of the Trustees at Dresden 
Wed 16th  11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist 

Sat 19th 6pm Great Vespers 
Sun 20th 10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy 
Wed 23rd 11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist 

Sat 26th  Liturgy & Blessing of the Waters at Stoney Middleton 
6pm Great Vespers 
Sun 27th  10am Matins; 11am Divine Liturgy 
Wed 30th  11am Divine Liturgy or Akathist 

August 1st ~ Beginning of the Dormition Fast 
August 2nd ~ Pilgrimage to Saint Bertram in Ilam (No Local Services) 


Name Days 
10th Alexander Oliver Joy 
12th Veronica Irene Dobson 
17th Marina Guinness 
18th Dara Elizabeth Davidchack; Elizabeth Nash; Elizabeth Ella Jade Reeves 
20th Monk Elia; Ghassan Ayoub 
22nd Mary (Maria) 
24th Anca Bostan 

Reposed 
23rd Tameena Ayoub (2011) 
26th James Arthur Carter (2008) 
31st Tsinara (2008) 

Parish Feasts 
17th Agia Marina, Longton; St Marina, Grimsby. 






July 12th - Pilgrimage to Croyland

The year 870 is especially memorable for the cruel outrages of the pagan Danes, who in
different parts of the country slaughtered innumerable victims, in their thirst for
conquest and hatred of our holy religion. Lincolnshire and East Anglia were among the
provinces which suffered most, and there, shortly before the glorious martyrdom of St
Edmund, the chief monasteries were utterly destroyed. Bardney in Lincolnshire, where
the relics of St Oswald had long reposed, was entirely demolished, and all the monks
murdered, without leaving so much as a record of their names. The same took place at
Ely, where the two communities of men and women founded by St Etheldreda were put
to the sword. At Peterborough, then called Medehampstead, the Abbot Hedda and all
his monks, in number 
eighty-four, were also 
exterminated, the shrines 
of the Saints profaned, and 
the library burned. It was 
on the 26th or 30th of 
August that the barbarians 
reached Croyland, the 
celebrated retreat of St 
Guthlac. The solemn Mass 
was just ended but the 
clergy had not left the 
sanctuary, when the 
pagans broke into the 
church. The celebrant, 
who was the Abbot 
Theodore, the Deacon Elfgetus, and the Sub-deacon Savinus, were murdered in the 
sacred vestments before the altar, and shortly 
afterwards the Acolyths Egdred and Ulrick.
Some of the community escaped, and hid
themselves in a neighbouring forest; but those 
who sought to conceal themselves within their 
own walls seem all to have been discovered 
and cruelly butchered. Amongst these were 
Askegar, the Prior, and Sethwin, the Sub-prior, 
as well as two venerable monks, Grimkeld and 
Agamund, who had attained their hundredth 
year. The shrine of St Guthlac was profaned, 
and the holy place left in a state of complete 
desolation. It was about the same time that the 
Monastery of Bennet Hulme in Norfolk was 
destroyed in the like manner, and the holy man 
Suniman, for whom it had been built about half 
a century before, put to death with all his 
community. 

Troparion to All the Saints of Lincolnshire (Tone 8) 
As the bountiful harvest of your sowing of salvation, 
the shire of Lincoln offers to you, Lord, 
all the saints who have shone in these lands. 
By their prayers, keep the church and our land in abiding peace, 
through the Theotokos, O most merciful One.